Posts Tagged ‘Quadrant’

LG Optimus L3 E400 SunSpider and Quadrant benchmark

October 14, 2012

The Optimus L3 E400 is one of LG’s cheapest Android smartphones. Despite having been launched this year, the phone still runs the almost two years old 2.3 Gingerbread version of the Android mobile OS and LG apparently is not very interested in updating it to more current Android versions such as 4.0 ICS or 4.1 Jelly Bean.

As a low-cost offering, LG didn’t put in the L3 the latest and greatest hardware specs but bearing in mind this phone competes around the €100 price-point it can’t be expected to have much better specs than the ones it already has.

As usual, I’ve run the SunSpider javascript benchmark in the Android stock browser.

 

As expected, the result is nothing to be proud about at 4434.1 ms, worse than competitors like the previously tested Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman. Chrome would probably be faster, but unfortunately it isn’t available for the 2.3 Gingerbread version of Android which means the small LG can’t run it.

The Quadrant benchmark overall result is also average (1092 points). Considering the really low resolution of the screen at just 240×320 (~125 pixels per inch) I was expecting the Adreno 200 GPU to achieve better results.

In the end, performance isn’t just the selling point for this LG as other features (such as price, size or battery life) might have greater impact in the buying decision process.

 

Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman performance with Android ICS

August 30, 2012

Sony Ericsson promised that all the 2011 Xperia line along with the Live with Walkman model would get updated to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

They took their time and the carriers also took an extra time before releasing the firmware to the carrier-locked devices. Recently I was finally able to go through the ICS update process with the Live with Walkman I’ve posted a short hands-on a while ago.

The update process is pretty straight forward as long as you know how to use a computer, since Sony Ericsson (now only Sony without the Ericsson part) demands the user to connect the phone to the PC Companion Windows software or to the Bridge for Mac app in order to get Android 4.0. Apparently the update it too big to be handled as a simple OTA (over the air) update!

Sony also warns on their website that Android 4.0 is heavier than the older 2.x versions and that might have a negative impact on how the smartphone performs.

I’ve installed the official Android 4.0.4 update and ran the Quadrant benchmark to check if the update had any impact on the performance figures.

The score is, as the manufacturer warned, lower than before: 1381 is indeed not as good as the score Android Gingerbread achieved, around eighteen hundred points.

I’ve run the test twice to see if there was any improvement in the second run but, as you can see below, it just got a little bit worst, achieving 1362 points: disappointing!

I also ran the SunSpider web-browser javascript benchmark and fortunately, unlike the Quadrand score, the results improved as you can see below.

Now the test is completed in 3099.8 ms which is better than the old result (3342.7 ms)!

Overall, and despite the bugs and the performance hit, I do recommend updating because newer apps require Android 4.0 ICS to run, like Google’s own Chrome web browser!

Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman hands-on impressions

November 28, 2011

Recently I had the opportunity to try one of the newest and cheapest Android phones from Sony Ericsson, the Live with Walkman.

When I tried it for the first time I had no expectations whatsoever because it’s being sold, as a prepaid cell phone in some European carriers, at a really low price that beats most, if not all, of it’s competitors (mainly Chinese companies like ZTE and Huawei).

What took me by surprise is that the phone turns out to be awesome!

I was completely convinced by the good build quality, by the rather nice camera (with 5 MP and 720p video recording) and ultimately by the performance. This low-cost Android handset has exactly the same hardware (SoC, memory, etc.) the more expensive Xperia brothers (such as the Arc and the Neo) have inside but because this hardware (SnapDragon 1GHz CPU, Adreno 205 GPU, 512 MB RAM) only needs to run a smaller (3,2″) and lower resolution display (320×480) the phone actually is as fast (or even faster) when compared to the older brothers.

If you run the Quadrant benchmark, as you can see below, it is able to score between low seventeen hundreds up to 1869, which is a great result for a phone that’s competing near the €100 price point!

I’ve also ran the SunSpider javascript benchmark and the result left me very impressed… again: 3342.7 ms!

Of course perfection is a thing one can always aim at but never achieve and this phone has one thing that keeps it from being perfect: the screen! I’m not complaining about the low resolution (which brings some performance benefits) but the contrast and the color reproduction is not really good (there is no mobile Bravia Engine) and the phone does not adjust the screen brightness automatically, so here you have the phone’s Achilles’ heel!

My conclusion after playing with it a couple of days is that this phone is actually a great bargain, does very well what most Android phones do (regardless of price), and even if the screen isn’t the greatest one around it’s still worth every penny!